Zion Awaits

Scott Steinbrenner is 19 years old and came to know the Lord 16 years ago at Brooklyn Tabernacle. His passion for worship and ministry led him to serve as a Music Leader for World Changers, where he led worship and ministered to kids in Little Rock, AR; Columbus, MS; Tupelo, MS; and Chattanooga, TN. Scott is a member of Spotswood Baptist Church and has been serving there for over four years. 

 


As believers, we can be thankful we do not live under the Old Testament covenant, because we would be dead, or worse: living a long life with the guilt and travesty of our many sins. However, since we are God’s children, we have a new covenant through His son Jesus that drastically changes our eternal trajectory. No longer do we have to live in shame and condemnation, because there is no condemnation in Jesus.

Hebrews 12:18-24 gives a perfect image of the old that has gone and the new that has come. The writer of Hebrews poetically says, “You have not come to a mountain that can be touched and that is burning with fire…” (v. 18a). In the Old Testament, when the Israelites were wandering in the desert, Moses was the only one allowed to ascend the mountain to speak to God on behalf of the people. If anyone touched the mountain, they were stoned to death, a seemingly harsh punishment. Moses was the Great Intercessor, selected by God to be His mouthpiece, just as Jesus took his [Moses’s] place as the Great and Perfect Intercessor when God came near that blessed night two thousand years ago. In that moment, the Israelites needed to witness God’s power in action so that they might trust and respect Him.

How often do we stray from God’s love and need his infinite power to bring us back to our senses? What will it take to realize that God is the only being in the universe that loves us with a perfect love that transcends time and space? In light of this perfect love, we can rejoice in what is to come.

Hebrews 12:22 says, “but you have come to Mount Zion, to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem.”

Zion is a mountain in Jerusalem upon which the Holy Temple was built. In Psalms, David wrote about Zion as a place of pure joy. The exact place he spoke of was a section of the temple courtyard where the atonement offerings were made. How fitting that our heavenly dwelling place is compared to Zion: a place of purest joy, where Jesus atoned for our sins, once and for all, through spiritual perfection and a bond of love that can never and will never be broken, for all eternity.

Dear brother or sister, do not wallow in the doldrums brought on by self-pity and guilt, because those things are not from God. Rejoice in the fact that Jesus has ascended Mount Zion to atone for our sins, every single one of them, and will one day call us to climb the mountain with Him and be with Him forever and ever. Zion awaits.